Thomas R. Radomski, MD, MS

  • Assistant Professor of Medicine and Clinical and Translational Science
  • Director of Academic Programs in Clinical Research for the Institute for Clinical Research Education

Dr. Radomski  is an Assistant Professor of Medicine and Clinical and Translational Science and Director of Academic Programs in Clinical Research for the Institute for Clinical Research Education. He is affiliated with the Center for Pharmaceutical Policy & Prescribing and the VA Center for Health Equity Research and Promotion. As a practicing general internist and health services researcher, Dr. Radomski’s research focuses on ways to accurately measure and reduce the delivery of low-value care and how the receipt of care across multiple healthcare systems influences health service utilization, outcomes, and value. Currently, Dr. Radomski is supported by a K23 award for the National Institute on Aging to develop, validate, and apply a claims-based metric of low-value prescribing in older adults. His research has been published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, Journal of General Internal Medicine, American Journal of Public Health, and the Journal of the American Geriatric Society.  He is also active within the Society of General Internal Medicine (SGIM), and serves as the President of the SGIM Mid-Atlantic Region.

He resides in O’Hara Township with his wife, Brittany, and their two children: Derek and Audra. A proud undergraduate alumnus of Pitt and the Delta Chi Fraternity, Dr. Radomski enjoys following Pitt sports, trying out new restaurants, attending classical music concerts, and taking in the city by running in local races.

Education & Training

  • BS (Molecular Biology & Political Science), University of Pittsburgh, 2006
  • MD, Penn State University, 2010
  • Internal Medicine Residency, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, 2013
  • Chief Medical Resident, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, 2014
  • General Internal Medicine/Clinical Research Fellowship, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, 2016
  • MS in Clinical Research, University of Pittsburgh, 2016

Representative Publications

Radomski TR, Huang Y, Park SY, Sileanu FE, Thorpe CT, Thorpe JM, Fine MJ, Gellad WF. Low‐value prostate cancer screening among older men within the Veterans Health Administration. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. 2019;67(9):1922-1927.

In a national cohort of older veterans, this study found that more than one in six received low‐value prostate-specific antigen screening, with greater than 10‐fold variation across VA Medical Centers and high rates of screening among those with the greatest mortality risk.

Radomski TR, Zhaoa X, Hanlonac JT, Thorpe JM, Thorpe CT, Naples JG, Sileanu FE, Cashy JP, Hale JA, Mor MK, Hausmann LRM, Donohue JM, Suda KJ, Stroupe KT, Good CB, Fine MJ, Gellad WF. Use of a medication-based risk adjustment index to predict mortality among veterans dually-enrolled in VA and Medicare. Healthcare. 2019; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.hjdsi.2019.04.003.

Applying a medication-based risk adjustment index may enhance the accuracy of studies examining VA and non-VA care and enable risk adjustment when diagnostic claims are not available or biased.

Radomski TR, Bixler FR, Zickmund SL, Roman KM, Thorpe CT, Hale JA, Sileanu FE, Hausmann LRM, Thorpe JM, Suda KJ, Stroupe KT, Gordon AJ, Good CB, Fine MJ, Gellad WF. Physicians’ perspectives regarding prescription drug monitoring program use within the Department of Veterans Affairs: a multi-state qualitative study. Journal of General Internal Medicine. 2018;33(8):1253-1259.

This qualitative study consisting of semi-structured interviews found that VA physicians broadly supported prescription drug monitoring programs, but noted administrative burdens and incomplete or unavailable prescribing data as key barriers to use.

Radomski TR, Zhao X, Thorpe CT, Thorpe JM, Naples JG, Mor MK, Good CB, Fine MJ, Gellad WF. The impact of medication-based risk adjustment on the association between veteran health outcomes and dual health system use. Journal of General Internal Medicine. 2017;32(9):967-973.

In a national cohort of older veterans with type 2 diabetes, this retrospective cohort study found that the method of risk adjustment drastically influences the direction of effect in health outcomes among dual users of VA and Medicare, underscoring the need for standardized, reliable risk adjustment methods that are not susceptible to measurement differences across health systems.

Click here for a more complete bibliography of Dr. Radomski's works.

Research Interests

  • Measuring and reducing low-value healthcare
  • Dual use of VA and non-VA care
  • Prescription drug use in older adults
  • Risk adjustment using administrative pharmacy data